There’s always room for more tight, calculated synth-rock, and Dance For The Dying are more than happy to oblige. Here’s the exlusive premiere of “Mannequin,” the opener to the Washington, D.C. quartet’s forthcoming EP Puzzles For The Traveler. Frontwoman M.C. Wolfe’s vocals arch over the playful track, with frank lyrics about longing and desire. The band has clearly studied up on the New Wave classics, while flipping those influences into something that sounds fresh. Listen to the track, below.
 

 
Puzzles For The Traveler is out on October 2, and follows Dance For The Dying’s self-titled 2011 debut EP. After the band celebrates Puzzles For The Traveler with its hometown fans on September 29, it will be making its way to New York for the 2012 CMJ Music Marathon.
 
We caught up with drummer and band founder Chris Link via email to talk about the new EP.
 
I read that the band first got together via Craigslist. Would you suggest that for other bands?
Sure would! We know other bands that have come together this way, too. But there really is no one way to meet other musicians. Craigslist worked for us—mostly. M.C. was brought into the fold through mutual acquaintance.
 
What was your song writing process like for “Mannequin”?
M.C. brought in a really catchy verse complete with a keyboard part. We just kinda started jamming on that for a while and built a song around it. We try to write all of our songs together. Generally, one of us brings in a part or a few ideas and we play around until things start gelling. From there it’s about pulling the hooks up front and focusing some of the ideas.
 
Most of the songs on your new EP are named after inanimate objects or dead people, is this intentional?
As a group it seems like we have a problem with naming things. The names of our songs are usually the most prominent word in the song. M.C. does the lyric writing and has a bit of a fixation on tragedy in literature and morbidity in daily events. Lately she’s been gravitating toward anthropomorphizing objects to make analogies.