• Google is taking legal action to prevent sites like YouTube-MP3.org from accessing and stripping the audio files from YouTube videos and playing them as stand-alone clips. The move comes after massive partnership deals between Google and YouTube (we’re talking nine figures here) to create YouTube channels that offer original programming.

  • A stage collapsed before Radiohead’s Toronto concert last weekend, killing 33-year-old drum technician Scott Johnson and injuring three others. The show was promptly cancelled, and ticket holders will receive a refund.

  • Rapper GZA (founding member of the Wu-Tang Clan) has taken some inspiration from the universe for his next album, Dark Matter. After meeting with top physicists and cosmologists at MIT and Cornell, GZA has taken it upon himself to create a series of concept albums in an attempt to get a wide audience “hooked on science.”

  • An anonymous indie label owner is speaking out about the true payment that indie labels receive from such streaming programs as Spotify, Zune and Rhapsody. The shocking information shows that, in the worst scenario, labels get paid only 1/140 what they would from an iTunes download.

  • Justin Vernon is branching out into the world of fashion. Partnering with Keep and in support of the Best Friends Animal Society, Vernon created a shoe that features “herringbone accents, a black fishbone detail across the toe and a canvas upper custom dyed to a perfect pale salmon.” Fish shoes for $75? Throw them back.

  • Katy Perry is about to add the title of executive to her already mile-long resume. Perry is prepping to start her own record label, and in doing so, she plans to “avoid the things that take away any fighting chance for an artist to have financial success.” It’s kind of hard to avoid the Internet, Katy.

  • Tower Records founder Russell Solomon is about to begin archiving the history of his defunct record chain. Solomon is calling on former staff and customers to donate items from Tower Records history to his already huge stockpile of over 200 boxes of items that, once cataloged, can be viewed by the public.